Antinous, Exhibition

Exhibition: ‘Antinous: Boy made God’ at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford (UK)

Antinous has attracted renewed fascination since the High Renaissance. In the early 1500s, several portraits of the 'boy-favourite' were known in Rome, and numerous works of art were modelled on him. A clear example of the appeal of Antinous from this time may be seen in Lorenzetto's statue of Jonah in the Chuch of Santa… Continue reading Exhibition: ‘Antinous: Boy made God’ at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford (UK)

Hadrian, Roman Cooking

Felix dies natalis, Hadriane!

Happy 1943rd birthday, Hadrian! This year, I decided to cook Cato the Elder's recipe for Libum (sweet cheesecake) as Hadrian’s birthday cake. Libum (original recipe from LacusCurtius): Bray 2 pounds of cheese thoroughly in a mortar; when it is thoroughly macerated, add 1 pound of wheat flour, or, if you wish the cake to be… Continue reading Felix dies natalis, Hadriane!

Gladiator, Hadrian1900, Rome, SPQR

24 January AD 119 – Hadrian celebrates his 43rd birthday in Rome with gladiatorial games (#Hadrian1900)

One thousand nine hundred years ago, Hadrian celebrated his 43rd birthday in Rome, the first he spent in the capital as emperor. To mark the occasion, the emperor put on a gladiatorial show which lasted for six successive days. As reported by Dio Cassius and the Historia Augusta, many wild animals were slaughtered, including one… Continue reading 24 January AD 119 – Hadrian celebrates his 43rd birthday in Rome with gladiatorial games (#Hadrian1900)

Epigraphy, Hadrian1900, Rome, SPQR

January AD 119 – Hadrian inaugurates the new year in Rome (#Hadrian1900)

One thousand nine hundred years ago, Hadrian celebrated the new year (year 872 Ab urbe condita) in Rome as consul for the third time (COS III) and appointed Publius Dasumius Rusticus as ordinary consul. Rusticus is known only from his consulship and the reason why he received this prestigious honour is not known. It may… Continue reading January AD 119 – Hadrian inaugurates the new year in Rome (#Hadrian1900)

Athens, Exhibition, Greece, Hadrian1900

Exhibition: ‘Hadrian and Athens. Conversing with an Ideal World’ at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens (#Hadrian1900)

Since November of 2017, the National Archaeological Museum of Athens and the Italian Archaeological School at Athens have been hosting a temporary exhibition called "Hadrian and Athens. Conversing with an Ideal World" in the Gallery 31a of the Sculpture Collection. The exhibition celebrates the 1900 years since the beginning of Hadrian's principate in August AD… Continue reading Exhibition: ‘Hadrian and Athens. Conversing with an Ideal World’ at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens (#Hadrian1900)

Cyrenaica, Epigraphy, Hadrian1900

The rebuilding of Cyrene by Hadrian in AD 118/9 (#Hadrian1900)

In AD 115, while Trajan and the majority of the Roman troops were campaigning in Parthia in the East, the diasporic Jews rose against Rome, creating havoc in Cyrenaica, Egypt and Cyprus. The hostilities started in Cyrene and quickly spread to Alexandria, Judaism's largest city, and resulted not only in great loss of life but… Continue reading The rebuilding of Cyrene by Hadrian in AD 118/9 (#Hadrian1900)

Hadrian

Guest post: ‘Always in all things changeable’: The emperor and his tomb

An essay by Nick Leonard... The emperor of Rome, ‘god and Panhellene,’1 was not one to linger anywhere, and certainly not in the capital city that he despised. All the major hallmarks of Hadrian’s reign – his civic architectural projects, his defensive fortifications, his drilling of the legions – stemmed from a restlessness that compelled… Continue reading Guest post: ‘Always in all things changeable’: The emperor and his tomb

Epigraphy, Exhibition, Hadrian, Hadrian portrait, Museum

Exhibition: Three bronze portraits of Hadrian at the Louvre, Paris

Of the many bronze portraits of Hadrian that are known to have existed, only three have survived from antiquity. After the exhibition ‘Hadrian: An Emperor Cast in Bronze’ (see here) held at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem from December 2015 to June 2016, the Musée du Louvre is now inviting us to discover these exceptional… Continue reading Exhibition: Three bronze portraits of Hadrian at the Louvre, Paris

Hadrian1900, Rome, SPQR

The early reforms and economic policies of Hadrian (#Hadrian1900)

Upon his return to Rome (see previous post here), Hadrian’s first task was to regain the people’s favours after the killing of four ex-consuls who were accused of plotting against him. To boost his popularity and win over public opinion in Rome, the new princeps introduced a number of important financial reforms such as distributing largesses and remitting… Continue reading The early reforms and economic policies of Hadrian (#Hadrian1900)

Hadrian1900, Rome

9 July AD 118 – Hadrian enters Rome (#Hadrian1900)

After a long journey travelling from Antioch, through Asia Minor and the Danube provinces, Hadrian finally arrived in Rome on 9 July AD 118, almost a year after his accession to the throne following the death of Trajan in Cilicia. His arrival (adventus) in the capital was celebrated by the Arval Brethren with solemn sacrifices… Continue reading 9 July AD 118 – Hadrian enters Rome (#Hadrian1900)