Athens, Exhibition, Greece

Exhibition: ‘Hadrian and Athens. Conversing with an Ideal World’ at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens (#Hadrian1900)

Since November of 2017, the National Archaeological Museum of Athens and the Italian Archaeological School at Athens have been hosting a temporary exhibition called "Hadrian and Athens. Conversing with an Ideal World" in the Gallery 31a of the Sculpture Collection. The exhibition celebrates the 1900 years since the beginning of Hadrian's principate in August AD… Continue reading Exhibition: ‘Hadrian and Athens. Conversing with an Ideal World’ at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens (#Hadrian1900)

Cyrenaica, Epigraphy, Hadrian1900

The rebuilding of Cyrene by Hadrian in AD 118/9 (#Hadrian1900)

In AD 115, while Trajan and the majority of the Roman troops were campaigning in Parthia in the East, the diasporic Jews rose against Rome, creating havoc in Cyrenaica, Egypt and Cyprus. The hostilities started in Cyrene and quickly spread to Alexandria, Judaism's largest city, and resulted not only in great loss of life but… Continue reading The rebuilding of Cyrene by Hadrian in AD 118/9 (#Hadrian1900)

Hadrian

Guest post: ‘Always in all things changeable’: The emperor and his tomb

An essay by Nick Leonard... The emperor of Rome, ‘god and Panhellene,’1 was not one to linger anywhere, and certainly not in the capital city that he despised. All the major hallmarks of Hadrian’s reign – his civic architectural projects, his defensive fortifications, his drilling of the legions – stemmed from a restlessness that compelled… Continue reading Guest post: ‘Always in all things changeable’: The emperor and his tomb

Epigraphy, Exhibition, Hadrian, Hadrian portrait, Museum

Exhibition: Three bronze portraits of Hadrian at the Louvre, Paris

Of the many bronze portraits of Hadrian that are known to have existed, only three have survived from antiquity. After the exhibition ‘Hadrian: An Emperor Cast in Bronze’ (see here) held at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem from December 2015 to June 2016, the Musée du Louvre is now inviting us to discover these exceptional… Continue reading Exhibition: Three bronze portraits of Hadrian at the Louvre, Paris

Hadrian1900, Rome, SPQR

The early reforms and economic policies of Hadrian (#Hadrian1900)

Upon his return to Rome (see previous post here), Hadrian’s first task was to regain the people’s favours after the killing of four ex-consuls who were accused of plotting against him. To boost his popularity and win over public opinion in Rome, the new princeps introduced a number of important financial reforms such as distributing largesses and remitting… Continue reading The early reforms and economic policies of Hadrian (#Hadrian1900)

Hadrian1900, Rome

9 July AD 118 – Hadrian enters Rome (#Hadrian1900)

After a long journey travelling from Antioch, through Asia Minor and the Danube provinces, Hadrian finally arrived in Rome on 9 July AD 118, almost a year after his accession to the throne following the death of Trajan in Cilicia. His arrival (adventus) in the capital was celebrated by the Arval Brethren with solemn sacrifices… Continue reading 9 July AD 118 – Hadrian enters Rome (#Hadrian1900)

Antinous, Athens, Epigraphy, Exhibition, Greece, Hadrian, Hadrian1900

Exhibition: ‘Hadrian and Antinous: an encounter, 19 centuries later’ at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens (#Hadrian1900)

In the context of “The Unseen Museum” rotating-object programme and the temporary exhibition untitled "Hadrian and Athens Conversing with an Ideal World" which is currently taking place in the Gallery 31a of the Sculpture Collection, the Archaeological Museum of Athens brought to the fore two unique artefacts from the unknown world of their storerooms. Fifteen selected antiquities had… Continue reading Exhibition: ‘Hadrian and Antinous: an encounter, 19 centuries later’ at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens (#Hadrian1900)

Frontiers of the Roman Empire, Hadrian, Hadrian1900, Moesia Inferior, Moesia Superior, Pannonia

Late spring AD 118 – Hadrian inspects his troops along the Danube Limes (#Hadrian1900)

Soon after suppressing the disturbances that had broken out in Moesia Inferior (see previous post here), Hadrian embarked on a quick inspection of the military bases along the lower and middle Danube frontier. The new emperor knew the area well through his appointment as governor of the province of Pannonia Inferior in 106 AD, also… Continue reading Late spring AD 118 – Hadrian inspects his troops along the Danube Limes (#Hadrian1900)

Epigraphy, Greece, Hadrian1900

AD 118 – Hadrian sends letters of reply to Astypalaea and Delphi (#Hadrian1900)

Soon after the accession of Hadrian, a number of important cities sent congratulatory embassies to the new princeps by which they expressed their warm wishes and asked confirmation of the privileges bestowed to them by Trajan. One such embassy, sent from Hierapolis towards the end of AD 117, returned with a letter from the emperor.… Continue reading AD 118 – Hadrian sends letters of reply to Astypalaea and Delphi (#Hadrian1900)

Epigraphy, Hadrian, Museum

The only known copy of Hadrian’s lost autobiography in the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago

On 27 April 2018, the Oriental Institute Museum of the University of Chicago published on their Facebook page an image of what may be the only extant excerpt of Hadrian's lost autobiography. Written shortly before Hadrian's death, this autobiography appears to have taken the form of a series of letters to Antoninus Pius. ---