Bar Kokhba, Israel, Judaea

“Bar Kokhba: The Jew Who Defied Hadrian and Challenged the Might of Rome” by Lindsay Powell

A few months ago, I was honoured to receive a request from historian and writer Lindsay Powell to write a short blurb to appear on the back cover of his latest book on Bar Kokhba, the leader under whom the Jews united in their war against the Romans between AD 132 and 136. I sent… Continue reading “Bar Kokhba: The Jew Who Defied Hadrian and Challenged the Might of Rome” by Lindsay Powell

Frontiers of the Roman Empire, Germania, Germania Superior, Germany, Hadrian's travels, Roman Army

Winter AD 121/2 – Hadrian inspects the northern frontiers: part 1 Germania Superior (#Hadrian1900)

In the year AD 121, Hadrian left Rome and set off on an ambitious tour of the western provinces. His first intended destination was the German frontier (limes) which he probably reached in the autumn or winter of that year. A passage in Dio Cassius describing Hadrian bareheaded in the "German snows" (Dio 69.9.4) plausibly… Continue reading Winter AD 121/2 – Hadrian inspects the northern frontiers: part 1 Germania Superior (#Hadrian1900)

Augustus, Rome, SPQR

Guest post: “The many lives of an eternal monument” – the Mausoleum of Augustus renewed

An article by Nick Leonard. When Hadrian assumed control of the Roman Empire in AD 117, the vast, wealthy and powerful state that he inherited remained, in effect, the Principate of Augustus. More than a century after the first emperor’s death, many of the hallmark achievements of his reign and the administrative framework that he… Continue reading Guest post: “The many lives of an eternal monument” – the Mausoleum of Augustus renewed

France, Gaul, Hadrian's travels, Hadrian1900

Spring AD 121 – Hadrian departs for the northern provinces (#Hadrian1900)

Shortly after celebrating Rome's birthday (see here), Hadrian departed on his journey to the northern provinces and began his first extensive voyage through the empire. As he intended to be absent for a considerable time with little idea of a return date, it was necessary to leave the control of Rome in trustworthy hands. Annius Verus,… Continue reading Spring AD 121 – Hadrian departs for the northern provinces (#Hadrian1900)

Marcus Aurelius, Rome, SPQR

26 April AD 121- Future Philosopher-Emperor Marcus Aurelius is born (#Hadrian1900)

Happy 1900th birthday, Marcus Aurelius! 🎉 Marcus Aurelius Antoninus was born on 26 April 121 in Rome during the reign of Hadrian to an aristocratic family of Italo-Hispanic origin, the gens Annia. The family had settled in the southern Spanish province of Baetica, in the small town of Ucubi (modern-day Espejo), a few miles southeast… Continue reading 26 April AD 121- Future Philosopher-Emperor Marcus Aurelius is born (#Hadrian1900)

Hadrian, Hadrian1900, Rome, SPQR

21 April AD 121 – Hadrian celebrates Rome’s 874th birthday with circus games (#Hadrian1900)

Every year, the Romans celebrated the birthday of their city on the 21st of April, the day on which, according to early traditions, Romulus founded Rome by tracing the pomerium, the sacred urban boundary separating the city (urbs) from the country (ager). The celebrations were held during the Parilia, a rural festival associated with flocks and… Continue reading 21 April AD 121 – Hadrian celebrates Rome’s 874th birthday with circus games (#Hadrian1900)

Epigraphy, Hadrian1900, Plotina

Early AD 121 – Plotina writes to Hadrian on behalf of the Epicurean school in Athens (#Hadrian1900)

In the early year of AD 121, Pompeia Plotina, the greatly respected widow of the emperor Trajan, sent Hadrian a letter asking him to help the Epicurean school in Athens solve an issue regarding the rights of succession. According to Roman law, the head of the school was obliged to appoint a new leader from… Continue reading Early AD 121 – Plotina writes to Hadrian on behalf of the Epicurean school in Athens (#Hadrian1900)

Egypt, Epigraphy, Hadrian1900

18 February AD 121 – Titus Haterius Nepos, prefect of Egypt, visits the Memnon Colossus (#Hadrian1900)

On 18 February AD 121, Titus Haterius Nepos, the prefect of Egypt, visited the Colossus of Memnon at the Theban necropolis and heard the statue sing. Nepos immortalised his encounter by inscribing his name upon the right leg of the statue. In a five-line text written in Latin, Nepos attests that he heard Memnon an hour… Continue reading 18 February AD 121 – Titus Haterius Nepos, prefect of Egypt, visits the Memnon Colossus (#Hadrian1900)

Uncategorized

Felix dies natalis, Hadriane!

Happy 1945th birthday, Hadrian! As is tradition, I baked Hadrian a birthday cake. This year, I chose to cook Cato's recipe for savillum (a kind of cheesecake), one of my favourite desserts from antiquity. Savillum recipe in Latin (from LacusCurtius): Cato’s De Agricultura 84: Savillum hoc modo facito. Farinae selibram, casei P. II S una conmisceto quasi libum, mellis P.  et ovum… Continue reading Felix dies natalis, Hadriane!

Anthony Birley

In memoriam: Anthony Birley (1937-2020)

As if 2020 hadn't hurt us enough already, on Saturday 19th December, we lost one of the greatest Roman scholars, Professor Anthony Birley. The sad news of his passing at the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle was announced in a statement released by the Vindolanda Trust on Monday 21st December (see here).  Anthony Birley was… Continue reading In memoriam: Anthony Birley (1937-2020)