Epigraphy, Hadrian1900

The Acts of the Arval Brethren of AD 120 (#Hadrian1900)

As was the custom at the beginning of every year, annual public vows were made by all magistrates and all priestly colleges for the welfare and safety (salus) of the Emperor. Amongst the collegia inaugurating the new year with oaths were the Arval Brethren (fratres arvales), a highly exclusive priesthood revived by Augustus and centered around… Continue reading The Acts of the Arval Brethren of AD 120 (#Hadrian1900)

Hadrian1900, Trajanic dynasty

23 December AD 119 – Hadrian commemorates his mother-in-law, Salonia Matidia (#Hadrian1900)

In December of the year 119, Hadrian suffered a heavy personal blow. He said farewell to his beloved mother-in-law, Salonia Matidia, who had died in her early 50s. Immediately after her death, Hadrian granted upon her extravagant honours. He arranged for her deification, delivered a speech of praise, turned the commemoration of her death into… Continue reading 23 December AD 119 – Hadrian commemorates his mother-in-law, Salonia Matidia (#Hadrian1900)

Roman Portraiture, Rome, Uncategorized

NEW: An unnoticed portrait of Hadrian’s first heir, L. Aelius Caesar, in Rome’s Casino Aurora?

https://villaludovisi.org/2019/11/15/new-an-unnoticed-portrait-of-hadrians-first-heir-l-aelius-caesar-in-romes-casino-aurora/ Did I make a great discovery in the Ludovisi collection of Roman antiquities? While in Rome at the beginning of November, Corey Brennan (Associate Professor of Classics at Rutgers University), who generously invited me to stay at the American Academy of Rome, brought me to the Casino of the Villa Ludovisi (also known as Villa… Continue reading NEW: An unnoticed portrait of Hadrian’s first heir, L. Aelius Caesar, in Rome’s Casino Aurora?

Epigraphy, Hadrian, Phoenicia

The forest inscriptions of Hadrian in Mount Lebanon

Lebanon is famously known for the presence of a very special kind of tree, the legendary cedar tree (cedrus libani). It is emblazoned on the national flag and is, due to its long history, one of the most defining features of Lebanon's culture. The country is the most densely wooded in the Middle East, and… Continue reading The forest inscriptions of Hadrian in Mount Lebanon

Egypt, Epigraphy, Hadrian1900

4 August AD 119 – A letter from Hadrian conferring new rights to illegitimate children of soldiers is published in Alexandria (#Hadrian1900)

On 4 August AD 119, a copy of a letter written by Hadrian and addressed to Quintus Rammius Martialis, the prefect of Egypt (AD 117-19), was published in Alexandria. In his letter, Hadrian granted illegitimate children of soldiers conceived during their fathers' military service the right to inherit. The text was translated in Greek from… Continue reading 4 August AD 119 – A letter from Hadrian conferring new rights to illegitimate children of soldiers is published in Alexandria (#Hadrian1900)

Campania, Epigraphy, Hadrian1900, Italy, Latium

AD 119 – Hadrian visits Campania to aid the towns by gifts and benefactions (#Hadrian1900)

After less than a year spent in Rome since his arrival in the capital as the new emperor, Hadrian made a journey into Campania, the southern region of Italy where Greek civilization had once flourished. A passage in the Historia Augusta gives a chronological order of the events and states that the journey came after… Continue reading AD 119 – Hadrian visits Campania to aid the towns by gifts and benefactions (#Hadrian1900)

Hadrian, Roman engineering, Roman Temples, Rome

Guest post: How Hadrian helped rebuild the Pantheon

Learn about how Hadrian created the Pantheon as we know it today from the ruins of previous temples built by Marcus Agrippa and Domitian. A guest post by Context Travel Tours. Hadrian - the great unifier of the Roman Empire, the admirer of Athens, the architect, the poet, the visionary. As one of Rome’s most… Continue reading Guest post: How Hadrian helped rebuild the Pantheon

Hadrian1900

Spring AD 119 – Aulus Platorius Nepos is appointed as suffect consul (#Hadrian1900)

In spring AD 119, Aulus Platorius Nepos, a close friend of Hadrian, was appointed as consul suffectus (suffect consul), the supreme magistracy in Rome, before being sent out as governor of Germania Inferior. Nepos is known from a dedicatory inscription at Aquileia (CIL V 877, Smallwood 229) where he had been appointed patronus (patron). The local… Continue reading Spring AD 119 – Aulus Platorius Nepos is appointed as suffect consul (#Hadrian1900)

Antinous, Exhibition

Exhibition: ‘Antinous: Boy made God’ at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford (UK)

Antinous has attracted renewed fascination since the High Renaissance. In the early 1500s, several portraits of the 'boy-favourite' were known in Rome, and numerous works of art were modelled on him. A clear example of the appeal of Antinous from this time may be seen in Lorenzetto's statue of Jonah in the Chuch of Santa… Continue reading Exhibition: ‘Antinous: Boy made God’ at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford (UK)

Hadrian, Roman Cooking

Felix dies natalis, Hadriane!

Happy 1943rd birthday, Hadrian! This year, I decided to cook Cato the Elder's recipe for Libum (sweet cheesecake) as Hadrian’s birthday cake. Libum (original recipe from LacusCurtius): Bray 2 pounds of cheese thoroughly in a mortar; when it is thoroughly macerated, add 1 pound of wheat flour, or, if you wish the cake to be… Continue reading Felix dies natalis, Hadriane!