Hadrian, Numismatics, Rome

Dupondius commemorating Hadrian’s arrival in Rome on July 9, 118 A.D.

On this day (July, 9) in 118 A.D., Hadrian entered the city of Rome, eleven months after his succession to Trajan. RIC 554 Dupondius, 118 A.D. Obv: IMP CAESAR TRAIANVS HADRIANVS AVG Rad. r., dr. l. s. Rev: ADVENTVS AVG Roma, helmeted, seated r. on cuirass, holding spear in l. hand, clasping r. hands with… Continue reading Dupondius commemorating Hadrian’s arrival in Rome on July 9, 118 A.D.

Archaeology Travel, Photography, Rome, SPQR

Wandering along the Appian Way – images from milestone I to VI

"O Appian way, which Caesar consecrates under the form of Hercules, and renders the most celebrated of Italian roads..." Martial, Spectacula 9.101 Via Appia Antica, ancient Rome's "Queen of Roads", was once one of the world's most important roads. It was originally built in 312 BC by Appius Claudius Caecus, the then-censor of Rome, who began… Continue reading Wandering along the Appian Way – images from milestone I to VI

Archaeology Travel, Roman Temples, Rome, SPQR

The Temple of Venus and Roma, Upper Via Sacra, Rome

The Temple of Venus and Roma (Latin: Templum Veneris et Romae) was the largest temple in Ancient Rome. It was located at the far east side of the Forum Romanum, near the Colosseum. It was dedicated to the goddesses Venus Felix (Venus the Bringer of Good Fortune) and Roma Aeterna (Eternal Rome). The designer was… Continue reading The Temple of Venus and Roma, Upper Via Sacra, Rome

Rome, SPQR, Trajan

The Column of Trajan, Rome

Column of Trajan, Carrara marble, completed in 113 AD, Trajan's Forum, Rome On this day (26th May) 107 AD, Trajan celebrates a triumph for his victories over the Dacians. The celebrations lasted 123 days and entertained the populace with a vast display of gladiators and animals. In Rome, Apollodorus of Damascus designed and built in the huge… Continue reading The Column of Trajan, Rome

Hadrian, Rome, SPQR

Felix dies natalis, Roma!

Today (21st April) is the traditional date given for the founding of Rome. According to Roman mythology, the founders were Romulus and Remus, twin brothers and supposed sons of the god Mars and the priestess Rhea Silvia. The twins were then abandoned by their parents as babies (because of a prophecy that they would overthrow their great-uncle… Continue reading Felix dies natalis, Roma!