Hadrian1900, Trajan

Late September 117 AD – Hadrian receives the Senate’s response to his letter (#Hadrian1900)

After the death of Trajan on 8th August 117, Hadrian drafted from Syria a 'carefully worded' letter to the Senate in Rome in which he reported his accession and requested divine honours for his adoptive father. He also apologised for having assumed the imperial title only on the acclamation of the army, on the ground that… Continue reading Late September 117 AD – Hadrian receives the Senate’s response to his letter (#Hadrian1900)

Antinous, Hadrian, Italy, Roman art, Roman Portraiture, Rome

The Hadrianic Tondi on the Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine, dedicated on 25 July 315 AD, stands in Rome between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill, at what was once the beginning of the Via Triumphalis. As described on its attic inscription, it commemorates Constantine’s victory at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge on 28 October 312 AD over the tyrant… Continue reading The Hadrianic Tondi on the Arch of Constantine

Hadrian, Rome, SPQR

Felix dies natalis, Roma!

Today (21st April) is the traditional date given for the founding of Rome. According to Roman mythology, the founders were Romulus and Remus, twin brothers and supposed sons of the god Mars and the priestess Rhea Silvia. The twins were then abandoned by their parents as babies (because of a prophecy that they would overthrow their great-uncle… Continue reading Felix dies natalis, Roma!

Archaeology Travel, Italy, Museum, Roman art, Rome

When in Rome… a visit to the Centrale Montemartini

During a recent trip to Rome, I paid a long overdue visit to the Centrale Montemartini, an annexe of the Capitoline Museums located on the Via Ostiense just beyond Porta San Paolo. Centrale Montemartini was Rome's first electrical power station when it opened in 1912, and was later converted into a museum of ancient Roman… Continue reading When in Rome… a visit to the Centrale Montemartini

Augustus, Italy, Roman art, Roman Frescoes, Roman villa, Rome

When in Rome… visiting the House of Augustus on the Palatine Hill

Last year Rome celebrated the 2000th anniversary of Emperor Augustus’ death. To commemorate the date, a series of special events and openings were launched in the Italian capital, including the opening of new parts of the ‘House of Augustus’ and ‘House of Livia’ on the Palatine Hill. After years of restoration works, new lavishly frescoed… Continue reading When in Rome… visiting the House of Augustus on the Palatine Hill

Antoninus Pius, Hadrian, Italy, Museum, Roman art, Roman Temples, Rome

The Hadrianeum and the personifications of provinces

Just a short walk from the Pantheon, in Piazza di Pietra, are the majestic remains of the Temple of the deified Hadrian (Hadrianeum) built by Antoninus Pius, Hadrian's adopted son and successor. Of the original temple, only eleven columns with capitals and the cella wall are still visible today. In 1696, during the pontificate of… Continue reading The Hadrianeum and the personifications of provinces

Archaeology Travel, Photography, Rome, SPQR

Wandering along the Appian Way – images from milestone I to VI

"O Appian way, which Caesar consecrates under the form of Hercules, and renders the most celebrated of Italian roads..." Martial, Spectacula 9.101 Via Appia Antica, ancient Rome's "Queen of Roads", was once one of the world's most important roads. It was originally built in 312 BC by Appius Claudius Caecus, the then-censor of Rome, who began… Continue reading Wandering along the Appian Way – images from milestone I to VI

Archaeology Travel, Roman Temples, Rome, SPQR

The Temple of Venus and Roma, Upper Via Sacra, Rome

The Temple of Venus and Roma (Latin: Templum Veneris et Romae) was the largest temple in Ancient Rome. It was located at the far east side of the Forum Romanum, near the Colosseum. It was dedicated to the goddesses Venus Felix (Venus the Bringer of Good Fortune) and Roma Aeterna (Eternal Rome). The designer was… Continue reading The Temple of Venus and Roma, Upper Via Sacra, Rome

Rome, SPQR, Trajan

The Column of Trajan, Rome

Column of Trajan, Carrara marble, completed in 113 AD, Trajan's Forum, Rome On this day (26th May) 107 AD, Trajan celebrates a triumph for his victories over the Dacians. The celebrations lasted 123 days and entertained the populace with a vast display of gladiators and animals. In Rome, Apollodorus of Damascus designed and built in the huge… Continue reading The Column of Trajan, Rome

Hadrian, Hadrian portrait, Nerva–Antonine dynasty

Fragmentary bust of Hadrian, from the area of Santa Bibiana at Termini station, ca. 117-120, Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Rome

Inv. no. 124.491 Termini portrait sculptural type. This fragmentary bust was discovered in 1941 during work on the main train station (Stazione Termini) hence known now as the "Stazione Termini" type (eight similar examples are known).