Gladiator, Hadrian1900, Rome, SPQR

24 January AD 119 – Hadrian celebrates his 43rd birthday in Rome with gladiatorial games (#Hadrian1900)

One thousand nine hundred years ago, Hadrian celebrated his 43rd birthday in Rome, the first he spent in the capital as emperor. To mark the occasion, the emperor put on a gladiatorial show which lasted for six successive days. As reported by Dio Cassius and the Historia Augusta, many wild animals were slaughtered, including one… Continue reading 24 January AD 119 – Hadrian celebrates his 43rd birthday in Rome with gladiatorial games (#Hadrian1900)

Epigraphy, Hadrian1900, Rome, SPQR

January AD 119 – Hadrian inaugurates the new year in Rome (#Hadrian1900)

One thousand nine hundred years ago, Hadrian celebrated the new year (year 872 Ab urbe condita) in Rome as consul for the third time (COS III) and appointed Publius Dasumius Rusticus as ordinary consul. Rusticus is known only from his consulship and the reason why he received this prestigious honour is not known. It may… Continue reading January AD 119 – Hadrian inaugurates the new year in Rome (#Hadrian1900)

Hadrian1900, Rome, SPQR

The early reforms and economic policies of Hadrian (#Hadrian1900)

Upon his return to Rome (see previous post here), Hadrian’s first task was to regain the people’s favours after the killing of four ex-consuls who were accused of plotting against him. To boost his popularity and win over public opinion in Rome, the new princeps introduced a number of important financial reforms such as distributing largesses and remitting… Continue reading The early reforms and economic policies of Hadrian (#Hadrian1900)

Hadrian, Rome, SPQR

Felix dies natalis, Roma!

Today (21st April) is the traditional date given for the founding of Rome. According to Roman mythology, the founders were Romulus and Remus, twin brothers and supposed sons of the god Mars and the priestess Rhea Silvia. The twins were then abandoned by their parents as babies (because of a prophecy that they would overthrow their great-uncle… Continue reading Felix dies natalis, Roma!

Augustus, Museum, Photography, Roman Portraiture, SPQR

A tribute to Augustus

This week marks the bimillennial anniversary of the death of the first Roman emperor, Augustus. He died on 19th August AD 14 at the age of 75 after a 41-year reign, the longest in Roman history. Augustus left his mark on Rome and western civilisation like few others. He vastly expanded the Roman Empire, established… Continue reading A tribute to Augustus

Archaeology Travel, Britannia, Frontiers of the Roman Empire, Hadrian, Hadrian's Wall, Photography, Roman Army, SPQR

Walking Hadrian’s Wall – images from milecastle 42 to milecastle 37

Hadrian's Wall has long attracted hikers and history fans and is now the heart of an 84-mile-long (135 km) National Trail through some of Britain's most beautiful countryside. Hadrian's Wall stretches coast to coast across northern England, from Wallsend in the east to Bowness-on-Solway on the west coast. Three years ago, I set out to explore… Continue reading Walking Hadrian’s Wall – images from milecastle 42 to milecastle 37

Museum, Nerva–Antonine dynasty, Roman Portraiture, SPQR

Felix dies natalis, Luci Vere!

Lucius Ceionius Commodus, the future Lucius Verus, was born on December 15 in AD 130. He was the son of Aelius Caesar, Hadrian's first choice as a successor, but Lucius' father died when he was only seven years old. Having lost his first choice as successor, Hadrian designated Antoninus Pius to be his successor and… Continue reading Felix dies natalis, Luci Vere!

Museum, Roman Army, Roman art, SPQR

Artefact: Bronze caliga from an over life-size statue of a Roman cavalryman

Caligae were heavy hob-nailed military boots worn by the Roman legionary soldiers, auxiliaries and cavalrymen throughout the Roman Republic and Empire. This bronze caliga was part of an over life-size statue of a Roman cavalryman from the 1st or the 2nd century AD. It is exhibited at the Museo Civico Archeologico of Bologna. However this… Continue reading Artefact: Bronze caliga from an over life-size statue of a Roman cavalryman

Archaeology Travel, Croatia, Dalmatia, Photography, Roman Army, SPQR

Picture of the week: The arches of the Burnum principium in Dalmatia (Croatia)

I just got back from a one week holiday in Croatia. I had a fabulous time exploring wonderful places which will certainly be the subject of future posts. This photo was taken at the archaeological site of Burnum, a Roman Legionary camp located nearby the natural beauties of the Krka National park. The camp was… Continue reading Picture of the week: The arches of the Burnum principium in Dalmatia (Croatia)

Hadrian, SPQR, Trajan

The death of Trajan and accession of Hadrian

On 9th August 117 AD (or it might have been the 7th or 8th), the Emperor Trajan died suddenly from a stroke at Selinus in Cilicia on his way from Syria to Rome. This event prompted the renaming of the city as Trajanopolis and the building of a cenotaph to Trajan. Trajan lived 63 years and… Continue reading The death of Trajan and accession of Hadrian