Archaeology Travel, Germania, Gladiator, Roman art, Roman Mosaic

The Gladiator Mosaic at Bad Kreuznach, Germany

Last November, I visited the Römerhalle at Bad Kreuznach, Germany. It is a museum that displays finds from a late 2nd century Roman villa as well as other Roman finds from the district of Bad Kreuznach. Around 58 BC, the Rhineland-Palatinate region became part of the Roman Empire, with a Roman vicus named Cruciniacum, forming a supply station… Continue reading The Gladiator Mosaic at Bad Kreuznach, Germany

Rome, SPQR, Trajan

The Column of Trajan, Rome

Column of Trajan, Carrara marble, completed in 113 AD, Trajan's Forum, Rome On this day (26th May) 107 AD, Trajan celebrates a triumph for his victories over the Dacians. The celebrations lasted 123 days and entertained the populace with a vast display of gladiators and animals. In Rome, Apollodorus of Damascus designed and built in the huge… Continue reading The Column of Trajan, Rome

Archaeology Travel, Asia Minor, Photography, Turkey

Picture of the day: Cat among the ruins of the Prytaneion at Ephesus (Turkey)

Ephesus is teeming with cats. I happen to love cats and this is my best cat shot from Ephesus. The reason I chose this photo today is that I just caught Cat Scratch Disease, an infection following the scratch of a cat, not from Ephesus, but from the ancient city of Olympos in Lycia. I never knew such… Continue reading Picture of the day: Cat among the ruins of the Prytaneion at Ephesus (Turkey)

Hadrian, Hadrian portrait, Nerva–Antonine dynasty

Fragmentary bust of Hadrian, from the area of Santa Bibiana at Termini station, ca. 117-120, Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Rome

Inv. no. 124.491 Termini portrait sculptural type. This fragmentary bust was discovered in 1941 during work on the main train station (Stazione Termini) hence known now as the "Stazione Termini" type (eight similar examples are known).

Archaeology Travel, Frontiers of the Roman Empire, Germania, Germania Superior, Limes Germanicus

Exploring the Limes Germanicus – images from Rome’s Germanic Frontier

From one end of the empire to another! The Roman empire encircled the Mediterranean Sea, and beyond that, lay its frontiers. By the early 2nd century the empire was stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Black Sea, through the deserts of the Middle East to the Red Sea, and across North Africa. The “Limes”… Continue reading Exploring the Limes Germanicus – images from Rome’s Germanic Frontier

Britannia, Hadrian, Hadrian's Wall, Photography

Picture of the day: Sycamore Gap on Hadrian’s Wall, Northumberland (UK)

An absolutely beautiful spot! This iconic tree was made famous by the film Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991). It is one of the best Hadrian's Wall views and a much photographed point. The walk from Steel Rigg to Housesteads is my favourite part of the Wall and offers the best views Northumberland has to offer. The scenery and panoramic views are just… Continue reading Picture of the day: Sycamore Gap on Hadrian’s Wall, Northumberland (UK)

Hadrian, Hadrian's Villa, Italy

Picture of the day: The circular temple dedicated to the Venus of Knidos, Hadrian’s Villa (Tivoli, Italy)

The temple dedicated to the Venus of Knidos is a small circular temple with doric columns situated on the Temple Valley at Hadrian's Villa.  It belongs to the latest building phase at the villa, between AD 133 and 138. The circular plan of the central structure, the use of the Doric order, and the discovery of… Continue reading Picture of the day: The circular temple dedicated to the Venus of Knidos, Hadrian’s Villa (Tivoli, Italy)

Latrinae, SPQR

How the Romans did their business: images of Latrines throughout the Roman world

In Roman times, toilets used to be a public and convivial place. An epigram from Martial reveals just how public privies were among the most frequented places in the city for socializing: "In omnibus Vacerra quod conclavibus consumit horas et die toto sedet, cenaturit Vacerra, non cacaturit." which translates to "In privies Vacerra consumes the hours; the whole… Continue reading How the Romans did their business: images of Latrines throughout the Roman world

Aqueduct, Archaeology Travel, Spain, SPQR

Picture of the day: Los Milagros Aqueduct, Augusta Emerita (Mérida, Spain)

The Los Milagros Aqueduct (Acueducto de Los Milagros) is an incredibly well-preserved Roman water supply system in Mérida in Spain. Augusta Emerita was a Roman city in western Spain, modern Mérida, capital of the province of Lusitania. It was a very large city, which needed three aqueducts. The most impressive of these is the Los Milagros aqueduct "Miraculous Aqueduct".… Continue reading Picture of the day: Los Milagros Aqueduct, Augusta Emerita (Mérida, Spain)

Ancient Roman cuisine, Roman Cooking

A taste of Ancient Rome – Aliter Patina de Asparagis (Omelette with Asparagus and Fresh Herbs)

As it it Asparagus season, yesterday I tried this ancient recipe with asparagus called "Aliter Patina de Asparagis" and taken from Apicius’ book, “De Re Coquinaria”. It is made with eggs, asparagus, wine and lots of herbs. It turned out to be very tasty. I can’t wait to make it again! The recipe in Latin: Aliter patina de… Continue reading A taste of Ancient Rome – Aliter Patina de Asparagis (Omelette with Asparagus and Fresh Herbs)