Asia Minor, Cappadocia, Cilicia, Epigraphy, Hadrian's travels, Hadrian1900

15 October AD 117 – Hadrian crosses the Cilician gates and arrives in Cappadocia (#Hadrian1900)

On this day 1,900 years ago, Hadrian crossed the Cilician Gates (Pylae Ciliciae), the most famous mountain pass through the Taurus Mountain. The new Emperor was travelling northward into Cappadocia along the Via Tauri which run across the mountain chain. We know from a fragment of an itinerary found in Rome that Hadrian left Antioch… Continue reading 15 October AD 117 – Hadrian crosses the Cilician gates and arrives in Cappadocia (#Hadrian1900)

Epigraphy, Hadrian1900, Turkey

13 October AD 117 – Hadrian travels back to Rome and reaches Mopsucrene (#Hadrian1900)

At the beginning of October AD 117, the moment came for Hadrian to leave Antioch for Rome, leaving the command of the province of Syria to Catilius Severus who had just been installed as legate. But the Emperor could not return directly to Rome. He had received news of the uprising of the Sarmatian tribes who… Continue reading 13 October AD 117 – Hadrian travels back to Rome and reaches Mopsucrene (#Hadrian1900)

Alexandria, Egypt, Epigraphy, Hadrian1900, Roman Egypt

25 August AD 117 – The announcement of Hadrian’s accession in Alexandria (#Hadrian1900)

One thousand nine hundred years ago on this day, only two weeks after Hadrian's proclamation in Antioch, the new prefect of Egypt (Praefectus Aegypi), Quintus Rammius Martialis, addressed a circular letter to the strategoi of the Egyptian districts (nomes) announcing the imperial accession of Hadrian and instructing them to declare festivities for ten days. The… Continue reading 25 August AD 117 – The announcement of Hadrian’s accession in Alexandria (#Hadrian1900)

Cilicia, Epigraphy, Hadrian1900, Trajan, Turkey

12 August AD 117 – A mysterious death occurs in Selinus (#Hadrian1900)

On the 12th of August AD 117, Trajan's freedman and personal servant, the twenty-eight-year-old Marcus Ulpius Phaedimus, died in Selinus in Cilicia just a few days after his master and within a day of Hadrian receiving the news of Trajan's death. This coincidence only deepened the mystery surrounding the circumstances of Hadrian's adoption. Phaedimus, who had… Continue reading 12 August AD 117 – A mysterious death occurs in Selinus (#Hadrian1900)

Crete, Epigraphy, Hadrian, Hadrian portrait, Roman Mythology, Roman Portraiture, Roman Temples

The Hadrianic Temple of Diktynna in Crete

On the eastern tip of the Rodopou Peninsula in West Crete are the scanty remains of a temple dedicated to the Cretan goddess Diktynna (Diktynnaion). Diktynna was the virgin goddess of hunting and she was worshipped fervently in western Crete as the patroness of hunters and fishermen. --- Diktynna's name may be connected with Mount… Continue reading The Hadrianic Temple of Diktynna in Crete

Antinous, Epigraphy, Hadrian, Hadrian's Villa, Rome

The Obelisk of Antinous

While Hadrian was visiting the province of Egypt in late AD 130, his favourite, Antinous, drowned mysteriously in the Nile River. This tragic event led to the creation of a new divinity: Osirantinous, or Antinous as a manifestation of Osiris, the god who died and was reborn. One of our best sources for information about… Continue reading The Obelisk of Antinous

Britannia, Epigraphy, Exhibition, Hadrian, Hadrian portrait, Judaea

Exhibition: ‘Hadrian: An Emperor Cast in Bronze’ in Jerusalem

The Israel Museum in Jerusalem held until the end of June 2016 an exhibition dedicated to Hadrian: 'Hadrian: An Emperor Cast in Bronze'. The exhibition was curated by David Merovah (Curator of Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine Archaeology) and Rachel Caine Kreinin (Associate Curator) from the Israel Museum together with Thorsten Opper (Curator of the Department of… Continue reading Exhibition: ‘Hadrian: An Emperor Cast in Bronze’ in Jerusalem

Archaeology Travel, Asia Minor, Epigraphy, Galatia, Hadrian, Museum, Turkey

The cuirassed statue of Hadrian from Ancyra’s theatre (Ankara, Turkey)

Hadrian and his travels have often served as the guiding thread for my travels. However my recent trip to Turkey had a different focus, the Hittite civilization, with one of the highlights being a visit to the Museum of Anatolian Civilizations in Ankara. After dazzling at the magnificent artifacts on display on the main floor… Continue reading The cuirassed statue of Hadrian from Ancyra’s theatre (Ankara, Turkey)

Aqueduct, Epigraphy, Hadrian, Israel, Judaea, Roman engineering

The Hadrianic aqueduct of Caesarea Maritima, Israel

Caesarea Maritima is perhaps one of Israel’s most famous attractions. Its ruins are located by the sea-shore of Israel about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa. It is the site of one of the most important cities of the Roman World, the capital of the province of Judaea. The city was founded between 22 and 10 BC… Continue reading The Hadrianic aqueduct of Caesarea Maritima, Israel

Archaeology Travel, Epigraphy, Hadrian, Israel, Judaea, Photography, Roman Army, SPQR

Exploring Aelia Capitolina, Hadrian’s Jerusalem

With thousands of archaeological sites, Jerusalem is one of the most excavated cities on the planet and to walk its streets is to walk through a thousand years of history. This ancient city has been fought over more than any other place. It has been conquered, destroyed and rebuilt many times and Hadrian played a… Continue reading Exploring Aelia Capitolina, Hadrian’s Jerusalem